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Motivated to save lives

The 162nd Medical Group trains on In-Place Patient Decontamination, IPPD, July 15, 2014 at the wing medical facility. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Gregory Ferreira/Released)

The 162nd Medical Group trains on In-Place Patient Decontamination, IPPD, July 15, 2014 at the wing medical facility. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Gregory Ferreira/Released)

The 162nd Medical Group trains on In-Place Patient Decontamination, IPPD, July 15, 2014 at the wing medical facility. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Gregory Ferreira/Released)

The 162nd Medical Group trains on In-Place Patient Decontamination, IPPD, July 15, 2014 at the wing medical facility. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Gregory Ferreira/Released)

The 162nd Medical Group trains on In-Place Patient Decontamination, IPPD, July 15, 2014 at the wing medical facility. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Gregory Ferreira/Released)

The 162nd Medical Group trains on In-Place Patient Decontamination, IPPD, July 15, 2014 at the wing medical facility. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Gregory Ferreira/Released)

TUCSON --

Airmen assigned to the 162nd Wing showcased their medical deployment skills during a decontamination exercise July 15 at the medical facility here.

The decontamination, DECON, exercise lasted two days and consisted of three scenarios that evaluated Airmen's abilities to perform in-place patient decontamination, IPPD.

"We do the exercise to show we are capable of working together to get the job done, and are reliable in the event of an emergency situation," said Master Sgt. Tracy Jorgensen, a health systems specialist assigned to the 162nd Medical Group.

During the Wing's last inspection, the decontamination process took the team 26 minutes. Their hard work and diligent efforts since the inspection have resulted in a 10-minute reduction in their decontamination processing time, said Jorgensen.

"One of the most challenging parts about the DECON exercise is getting people to join the team," said Jorgensen.

Although the team has five fewer people than a normal IPPD processing team, they still performed flawlessly, said Jorgensen. We have a team of highly motivated individuals, she said.