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Drag chutes a new sight at 162nd

A Royal Netherland’s Air Force F-16 assigned to the Arizona Air National Guard’s 162nd Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport lands here Friday, Dec. 10, using a drag chute. Chutes are typically employed by Dutch fighters as a safety feature for short field landings and adverse weather conditions. They can reduce the needed runway length by nearly 50 percent. U.S.-owned F-16s at the airport don’t use drag chutes, making this type of landing unique to the Dutch pilot training program here. (U.S. Air Force photo/Maj. Gabe Johnson)

A Royal Netherland’s Air Force F-16 assigned to the Arizona Air National Guard’s 162nd Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport lands here Friday, Dec. 10, using a drag chute. Chutes are typically employed by Dutch fighters as a safety feature for short field landings and adverse weather conditions. They can reduce the needed runway length by nearly 50 percent. U.S.-owned F-16s at the airport don’t use drag chutes, making this type of landing unique to the Dutch pilot training program here. (U.S. Air Force photo/Maj. Gabe Johnson)

A Royal Netherland’s Air Force F-16 assigned to the Arizona Air National Guard’s 162nd Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport lands here Friday, Dec. 10, using a drag chute. Chutes are typically employed by Dutch fighters as a safety feature for short field landings and adverse weather conditions. They can reduce the needed runway length by nearly 50 percent. U.S.-owned F-16s at the airport don’t use drag chutes, making this type of landing unique to the Dutch pilot training program here. (U.S. Air Force photo/Maj. Gabe Johnson)

A Royal Netherland’s Air Force F-16 assigned to the Arizona Air National Guard’s 162nd Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport lands here Friday, Dec. 10, using a drag chute. Chutes are typically employed by Dutch fighters as a safety feature for short field landings and adverse weather conditions. They can reduce the needed runway length by nearly 50 percent. U.S.-owned F-16s at the airport don’t use drag chutes, making this type of landing unique to the Dutch pilot training program here. (U.S. Air Force photo/Maj. Gabe Johnson)

A Royal Netherland’s Air Force F-16 assigned to the Arizona Air National Guard’s 162nd Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport lands here Friday, Dec. 10, using a drag chute. Chutes are typically employed by Dutch fighters as a safety feature for short field landings and adverse weather conditions. They can reduce the needed runway length by nearly 50 percent. U.S.-owned F-16s at the airport don’t use drag chutes, making this type of landing unique to the Dutch pilot training program here. (U.S. Air Force photo/Maj. Gabe Johnson)

A Royal Netherland’s Air Force F-16 assigned to the Arizona Air National Guard’s 162nd Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport lands here Friday, Dec. 10, using a drag chute. Chutes are typically employed by Dutch fighters as a safety feature for short field landings and adverse weather conditions. They can reduce the needed runway length by nearly 50 percent. U.S.-owned F-16s at the airport don’t use drag chutes, making this type of landing unique to the Dutch pilot training program here. (U.S. Air Force photo/Maj. Gabe Johnson)

TUCSON, Ariz. -- A Royal Netherland's Air Force F-16 assigned to the Arizona Air National Guard's 162nd Fighter Wing at Tucson International Airport landed here Dec. 10 using a drag chute.

Chutes are typically employed by Dutch fighters as a safety feature for short field landings and adverse weather conditions. They can reduce the needed runway length by nearly 50 percent.

U.S.-owned F-16s at the airport don't use drag chutes, making this type of landing unique to the Dutch pilot training program here.